Category Archives: creativity

changing paradigms by Ken Robinson

Another talk about Ken Robinson pn Changing Paradigms. This time with a creative way to visualize it.

What implications might this have for Sunday school and spiritual formation?

imaging God

Life has suddenly turned busy over the last few weeks as I continue to work, now have 2 kids in school and have started back to school myself in a doctoral program focused on discernment of images and activity in a shifting culture (depending on what you call it).

In one chat session with our cohort last week, we discussed the picture to the left that is Michaelangelo’s painting of God’s Creation of Adam on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. In September 2004, I saw this painting from the floor of the Sistine Chapel but I had never considered the significance of the painting.

As you look at the painting some questions to consider: What is the focus of the painting? How is Adam portrayed in the painting? What is God doing? How are they interacting? What does the space between signify?

See what you come up with as you think through this painting. The image is powerful and certainly communicates more than a 1000 words.

just plain funny

Not sure if you’ve seen this video but a friend sent it to me earlier today while I was studying in the library and I almost forgot I was in the library.

I would love to do this in the midst of a coffee shop to see people’s reactions.

Opportunities to Change Our World

Tonight, Amy and I had so much fun together as we dreamed and wrote about a challenge that someone put forward in our faith community for different community groups. We sent out an email and facebook notes that pointed people to a great opportunity, which I mention below.
When a group of people make a little time, dream together, think creatively about how to use limited resources and finally make a community decision (at times there are too many options), I believe this imaginative community is what the community of faith is all about. See, God desires to change the world through a ragamuffin group of people who are able to take a little risk and trust that God will bring life from death. He will turn our limited resources into his unlimited resources.
If you are interested, this is what we sent out to friends and family around the country:
Someone in our faith community gave $100 to a number of groups of people and challenged us to make an impact in our world. Our community group decided to raise awareness and money for Opportunity International by having a dessert night and inviting friends to learn more.
We hope there’s no pressure to donate, we will simply share about this organization whose work we genuinely respect. Amy and I realize that a number our friends and family live outside of the San Diego area but there is still a way that you can help. You can still make a difference!
There are other ways that you can contribute to the challenge than attending to our dessert nights this coming month. (1) For every person who signs up for the bi-monthly eNewsletter, Opportunity International gets $10 from a Matching Challenge. Please send us a quick email and let us know if you sign up.(2) If you are a parent OR if you would are looking for a unique gift for a family of children, we would like to let you know about a book called One Hen: How One Small Loan Made A Big Difference. If you purchase the book through http://www.amazon.com/One-Hen-Small-Loan-Difference/dp/1554530288/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1204302752&sr=1-1, they will contribute 4% of revenue to Opportunity International. We just got a couple copies in the mail today and are excited to share the story and vision with Brighton and Everett.
Here is the story: “Inspired by true events, One Hen tells the story of Kojo, a boy from Ghana who turns a small loan into a thriving farm and a livelihood for many. After his father died, Kojo had to quit school to help his mother collect firewood to sell at the market. When his mother receives a loan from some village families, she gives a little money to her son. With this tiny loan, Kojo buys a hen. A year later, Kojo has built up a flock of 25 hens. With his earnings Kojo is able to return to school. Soon Kojo’s farm grows to become the largest in the region. Kojo’s story is inspired by the life of Kwabena Darko, who as a boy started a tiny poultry farm just like Kojo’s, which later grew to be the largest in east Africa. Kwabena also started a trust that gives out small loans to people who cannot get a loan from a bank. One Hen shows what happens when a little help makes a big difference. This help comes in the form of a microloan, a lending system for people in developing countries who have no collateral and no access to conventional banking. Microloans have begun to receive more media attention in recent years. In 2006 Muhammad Yunus, a Bangledeshi economist who pioneered microloan banking, won the Nobel Peace Prize. The final pages of One Hen explain the microloan system and include a list of relevant organizations for children to explore.”
No pressure but these are a few easy ways to change a small part of our world.