Category Archives: faith

creativity…rethinking intelligence

A friend sent me this TED talk by Dr. Ken Robinson today and it has me thinking about how we experience the world and the God who created the world.

If you want a more in depth perspective, take a look at The Master and His Emissary: The Divided Brain and the Making of the Western World by Iain McGilchrist. Thick book but solid perspective of the brain in the Western world.

How do you understand intelligence and how do you cultivate creativity?

the burn of horseradish

Last night a group of 13 of us ate a Passover Seder meal together at our house; it was a very unique time of looking forward to Easter and the fulfillment of this meal. One of the most unique elements of the meal is Maror (bitter herbs) as represented by horseradish.

Have you ever eaten raw horseradish? We all picked up a small piece at the same time and ate it together. As we took our first bite together, everyone was gasping for air, looking for something to drink and choking back tears. It was honestly five minutes of hilarity as I was nearly dying and looking around at everyone else’s reaction.

One of the participants last night shared this article with me this morning so we can grown our own horseradish for next year. Anyone interested?

Opportunities to Change Our World

Tonight, Amy and I had so much fun together as we dreamed and wrote about a challenge that someone put forward in our faith community for different community groups. We sent out an email and facebook notes that pointed people to a great opportunity, which I mention below.
When a group of people make a little time, dream together, think creatively about how to use limited resources and finally make a community decision (at times there are too many options), I believe this imaginative community is what the community of faith is all about. See, God desires to change the world through a ragamuffin group of people who are able to take a little risk and trust that God will bring life from death. He will turn our limited resources into his unlimited resources.
If you are interested, this is what we sent out to friends and family around the country:
Someone in our faith community gave $100 to a number of groups of people and challenged us to make an impact in our world. Our community group decided to raise awareness and money for Opportunity International by having a dessert night and inviting friends to learn more.
We hope there’s no pressure to donate, we will simply share about this organization whose work we genuinely respect. Amy and I realize that a number our friends and family live outside of the San Diego area but there is still a way that you can help. You can still make a difference!
There are other ways that you can contribute to the challenge than attending to our dessert nights this coming month. (1) For every person who signs up for the bi-monthly eNewsletter, Opportunity International gets $10 from a Matching Challenge. Please send us a quick email and let us know if you sign up.(2) If you are a parent OR if you would are looking for a unique gift for a family of children, we would like to let you know about a book called One Hen: How One Small Loan Made A Big Difference. If you purchase the book through http://www.amazon.com/One-Hen-Small-Loan-Difference/dp/1554530288/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1204302752&sr=1-1, they will contribute 4% of revenue to Opportunity International. We just got a couple copies in the mail today and are excited to share the story and vision with Brighton and Everett.
Here is the story: “Inspired by true events, One Hen tells the story of Kojo, a boy from Ghana who turns a small loan into a thriving farm and a livelihood for many. After his father died, Kojo had to quit school to help his mother collect firewood to sell at the market. When his mother receives a loan from some village families, she gives a little money to her son. With this tiny loan, Kojo buys a hen. A year later, Kojo has built up a flock of 25 hens. With his earnings Kojo is able to return to school. Soon Kojo’s farm grows to become the largest in the region. Kojo’s story is inspired by the life of Kwabena Darko, who as a boy started a tiny poultry farm just like Kojo’s, which later grew to be the largest in east Africa. Kwabena also started a trust that gives out small loans to people who cannot get a loan from a bank. One Hen shows what happens when a little help makes a big difference. This help comes in the form of a microloan, a lending system for people in developing countries who have no collateral and no access to conventional banking. Microloans have begun to receive more media attention in recent years. In 2006 Muhammad Yunus, a Bangledeshi economist who pioneered microloan banking, won the Nobel Peace Prize. The final pages of One Hen explain the microloan system and include a list of relevant organizations for children to explore.”
No pressure but these are a few easy ways to change a small part of our world.

what we will do for our kids

There are times in life when I must chuckle about the circumstances that I choose to live in. It is 5 am in the morning on a beautifully dark day and I am sitting with 5 other perfectly quiet people on a sidewalk.

See, after a long, long day of work, I set my alarm for 3:30 am, which by the way didn’t go off because I rolled over 3 minutes before to see that it was time to get up from my short nap. I needed to get up and sit on this sidewalk before 7 am so that our 2 year old son can go to preschool next year…I am in line to turn in his application. By the time I arrived this morning, there were 4 others already in front of me – reading or sleeping. One guy looks as is he slept here all night as he has his whole camping gear set up.

I wonder at times why we do this to ourselves. Why we are willing to camp out for our kids so they can go to preschool. Isn’t this bizarre?